Bills Before NJ Assembly Expand Rights of Children, Domestic Abuse Victims

New proposed legislation recommended this week by the state’s Assembly Judiciary Committee would create significant changes in how certain family law matters are conducted, reports the New Jersey Law Journal. What’s on tap to be voted on? One bill expands children’s right to representation in parental termination cases and the other increases privacy rights for domestic violence victims. Here’s a look at what each entails: Read more

Post-nuptial Agreements More Commonplace Says Matrimonial Lawyers’ Group

Didn’t get a prenup? There may still be time to get a post-nuptial agreement, a post-wedding day option to protect personal assets that’s growing in popularity nationwide, especially among women. According to a recent poll of American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyer (AAML) members, more than half of divorce attorneys (51 percent) cite an increase in post-nuptial agreements over the past three years; 36 percent of these same lawyers report an increase in wives initiating the requests. Read more

Are You Sure Your Former Spouse Is Remarried?

When an ex-wife or ex-husband who receives spousal support remarries, it almost always means an end to alimony payments. But before you stop the checks, check the marriage license, because, as this case proves, staging an elaborate wedding doesn’t always mean that an actual marriage took place. Read more

Chad Johnson Refuses to Sign Divorce Papers: Can This Really Halt the Divorce Process?

NFL Pro-bowler Chad Johnson isn’t willing to let go of his marriage to estranged wife Evelyn Lozada, even though the Basketball Wives star recently served him with divorce papers. According to TMZ, Johnson (formerly known as Chad Ochocinco) has reportedly vowed not to participate in any divorce proceedings or sign divorce papers in the hopes he can still win back Lozada. Read more

New Jersey Bill Questions Conscionability in Prenuptial Agreements

prenup agreements New Jersey - conscionability
A bill under consideration in the New Jersey legislature (S-2151) will dramatically change how premarriage and precivil union contracts, also known as prenuptial agreements, are evaluated and enforced in the state. Presently, the courts determine the justness of a prenup at the time the couple seek their divorce, allowing for modifications in certain cases where health or financial circumstances have changed for spouses. Under the new bill, judges would be required to evaluate prenups for conscionability as of the date they were executed, which may be decades before the divorce. What are the pros and cons of the bill? What could this mean for your prenup? Weinberger Divorce & Family Law Group attorney Carmela Novi offers information and thoughts on how this possible new law might affect your divorce proceedings: Read more